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Water Sports

As well as the list of below Water Sports & Marine Based Activities to enjoy in this area, there are also many more activities to be sampled and  things to do in West Cork

Water Sports & Marine Based Activities in Baltimore, West Cork

Because of its maritime tradition, Baltimore is well known as the Water Activities Capital of Ireland. Activities to be enjoyed by the whole family include sailing around Roaring Water Bay, swimming especially on the beautifull beaches of Sherkin & Heir Island, snorkelling in Baltimore Harbour & Lough Ine, kayaking and diving on the South West Coast of Ireland, shore fishing & Sea Angling with spectacular scenery, unpolluted waters and wrecks galore.There's sea angling for everything from mackerel to tuna. Baltimore is especially well known for its shark and common skate fishing, both of which can produce a fish of well over 50kgs in weight.

Hire a self drive boat and be independent for a pleasant cruise around the harbour or a picnic on a beautiful sandy beach or cove nearby.The varied bird life is well done around the area.

Sometimes these can be seen from the shore, notably from Cape Clear Island, but the best view is from a boat where there is also the chance of seeing whales, dolphins, basking sharks, seals or even a leatherback turtle.

10 Useful Baltimore Links:

 

Baltimore Sailing School

Established in 1974. Under the local supervision and ownership of the Kennedy Family. A week or fortnight at the school will not only teach and introduce you to the art of sailing , but will provide you with an unforgettable holiday.Courses which run from June – September take place in wonderful Baltimore harbour and the region of Carbery’s 100 Isles. Most of the islands are uninhabited and are a wonderful place to spend a day. www.baltimoresailingschool.com

Glenua Sailing

Be challenged by Atlantic winds and waves along the magnificent south and west coasts of Ireland, with numerous scenic harbours and anchorages. Relish the challenge and gain a new confidence in your own ability afloat. Experience adrenalin- filled adventures on the high seas. On our Cruising Courses, you will learn to confidently and safely helm an 8 berth yacht in moderate conditions. Learn critical theory and practice, including passage planning, safety procedures, tidal calculation, pilotage, GPS navigation, use of VHF radio, night sailing, a variety of manoeuvres under sail and engine and crew management. Trainees on cruising course MUST have previous sailing experience.

Baltimore Sailing Club

teaches young sailors the old IYA skills. Now, under the ISA Junior Sailing Scheme, as many as three, three week courses for levels 1 to 5 are held during the summer with a total of up to 120 young sailors passing each year. Many fully qualified instructors are required to train and supervise this great effort with lots of boats on the water each day.

The Mirror dinghy continues to be the principal training craft. However a one week Optimist Class training has also been held for the last 8 years. The main types of dinghy now racing regularly in the club are Mirrors, Lasers, Toppers, Optimists and Wayfarers.

The International Optimist Dinghy Association in Ireland (IODAI) Spring Training Clinic will be held in Baltimore from  Monday 15th to Friday 20th February 2015.

Heir Island Sailing School

Mission Statement
To provide sailing instruction and certification to Irish Sailing Association standards in a safe and friendly environment, in keeping with the skill and talents of the individual. Such instruction will be provided in an environment where teamwork is a top priority, and where the instruction is conducted in a cultural backdrop of Celtic history, art adventure, and traditional Irish cuisine.

Sea-Kayaking in West Cork

Sea kayaking is becoming more and more popular as an exciting outdoor activity. Though a considerable amount of skill and experience is required for ocean seas and difficult weather, kayakers can quickly learn the sport under the guidance of Atlantic Sea kayaking here in Baltimore, West Cork in the calm waters of Lough Ine, Barlogue, and Roaring Water Bay.
 
Weather conditions, tides, currents and many other factors must be closely observed for safety. Like all outdoor activities, learning how to paddle a sea kayak can seem difficult at first, but given the proper training and conditions, it is easy to learn. The equipment is designed to be very stable and easy to use. Most people are comfortably kayaking within the first few minutes on the water. It is a thrilling experience to propell yourself silently across the surface of the sea, admiring the beauty of West Cork. If you are generally fit you can do it.
 
Groups of friends love to go away together and an increasing trend within the 25-40 age group is activity breaks in Ireland. And Baltimore in West Cork is one of the centres of activity holidays in Ireland with its rich variety of maritime activities. Surprisingly, West Cork marine wild life has been compared to that of New Zealand and National Geographic Adventure magazine dubbed West Cork as the New Zealand of Europe. Over twenty species of whales pass through these waters every year. Sea kayaking is the fastest growing water sport in the world and the unspoilt coastline of West Cork suits it perfectly. The sheltered harbour in Baltimore is one of the safest around and kayakers can expect clear waters and lots of small islands to discover.

A great way to orientate yourself to Baltimore is to take a short walk to the Baltimore Beacon. The unique signal tower sits proudly at the head of Baltimore harbour and from this vantage point potential kayakers can get some idea of the beauty of the coastline that they will soon be exploring. Baltimore itself is also worth some exploration before taking to the waves.Former British and Irish Kayaking champion Jim Kennedy runs Atlantic Sky Kayaking. Safety is paramount when kayaking in the sea and people of all experience levels are catered for. Kayakers can expect to stop off at ancient castles, sea caves and hopefully see an abundance of marine life such as seals, dolphins and even whales. One thing is for sure, kayaking is hungry work and after a day at sea it will definitely be time for a nice meal.

 Part of the attraction of West Cork is the diverse range of marine wildlife that can be viewed from a kayak. Whale Watch West Cork offers boat trips around the coastline and the good news is that your kayak can be loaded onto the boat and once you get out to sea you can hop back in the kayak from a close up view of the marine life. Whale and even shark sightings are common but even if you are unlucky enough not to spot one, the abundance seals and sea birds will more than make up for the disappointment.

Sea kayaking is becoming more and more popular as an exciting outdoor activity. Though a considerable amount of skill and experience is required for ocean seas and difficult weather, kayakers can quickly learn the sport under the guidance of Atlantic Seakayaking here in Baltimore, West Cork in the calm waters of Lough Ine, Barlogue, and Roaring Water Bay.

Weather conditions, tides, currents and many other factors must be closely observed for safety.

Like all outdoor activities, learning how to paddle a sea kayak can seem difficult at first, but given the proper training and conditions, it is easy to learn. The equipment is designed to be very stable and easy to use. Most people are comfortably kayaking within the first few minutes on the water. It is a thrilling experience to propell yourself silently across the surface of the sea, admiring the beauty of West Cork. If you are generally fit you can do it.

West Cork Tour with Atlantic Seakayaking:

This is a unique opportunity to experience Irish culture, food and adventure with Jim Kennedy, as he shares his local knowledge, networks and experience and opens the mystical door to a hidden Ireland. 

Ireland. The Hidden West Cork.

Day 1
  • Meet at Casey's of Baltimore where we will be based for the next two nights.  
  • Here we will take a little time to unpack, unwind meet the guides and get orientated. 
  • We have an early lunch at the hotel.
  • After lunch we visit the quaint fishing village of Union Hall.  http://www.unionhall.ie/
  • Here we are introduced to sea kayaking in a very leisurely and gentle way. We spend the afternoon exploring the coastline, seaweed foraging, and wildlife watching and exploring the amazing West Cork coastline by kayak and on foot.  We spend about three easy hours in the kayaks.
  • We then take a break for dinner and visit the Village of Castletownshend where we are treated to some of the great foods that has made West Cork such a special part of Ireland.
  • We dine in the very famous and unique Mary Anne’s Bar in Castletownshend.  
  • Just as dusk is falling we again take to the kayaks and set off on our special starlight / moonlight adventure with Atlantic Sea Kayaking using state-of-the-art double kayaks.  In 2012 Trip Advisor voted this trip as one of the top 10 kayak trips in the world.  The trip has also been praised by National Geographic. This magical kayak is a gentle and atmospheric adventure.Afterwards we return to Caseys of Baltimore Hotel looking forward to a nightcap before bed.  
Day 2 
  • This  morning you have time to unwind And enjoy Breakfast at Caseys of Baltimore hotel and relax before we begin our day of discovery.
  • We meet you at midday and today we get a chance to really experience the hidden Ireland. 
  • We visit some beautiful Atlantic scenic spots and take gentle hikes along the cliffs and beaches. 
  • We visit some of the local artisan food producers, hear their stories and maybe taste some of their produce, a truly special Irish experience.  This part of Ireland is famous for it organic producers and has become a big part of the slow food movement.  
  • We have lunch in another quaint pub, know for it organic produce and atmosphere. We get an opportunity to visit the Drombeg stone circle, said to be the best preserved one in Ireland and learn about its sacred ways. www.megalithicireland.com/Drombeg.htm 
  • Later that evening after a delicious West Cork dinner we retire to a local pub for traditional music and also get a chance to join in and play a Bodhran or at least have fun trying  (an Irish drum). Afterwards it is again back to Caseys of Baltimore hotel and a well-earned bed.
Day 3
  • After another great  breakfast. We say our goodbyes and depart. it is goodbye to new friends and special places. 
We say in Gaelic  Slan go foill   or “see you again some time.”
  • Price:  €495  p/p - prebooking essential.

Here is what some people have said about Atlantic Seakayaking :

  • Reviewed 1 October 2012  Trip Advisor Coleen from Minnesota 
‘When I lay dying and I'm playing my "final slideshow", my night kayak on Lough Hyne with Jim Kennedy of Atlantic Sea kayaking will definitely play...outstanding and magical experience! Mother Nature puts on the best show, and the fine people of Atlantic Sea Kayaking make great guides!
  • ‘Reviewed 11 September 2012 LucKas75  Glendale, California 
“This was the highlight of our Ireland trip . 
“ Jim, Thank you Thank you Thank you We were so happy to have gone on the kayaking trip. It was absolutely amazing. 
“The night was gorgeous. The trip was well coordinated. It's amazing. I still can't believe the beautiful scenery we saw. It was a dream
  • Jim Kennedy Specialist Guide:
    Specialises in all things Irish, especially coastal and marine wild life, seaweed, stories and music. 
    Has built up a network of adventurers, musicians and artisan food producers in Ireland.
    As well as hidden areas of interest of course.
    Owns and manages Atlantic Sea Kayaking. for more  see: www.atlanticseakayaking.com

Whale watching is becoming more and more popular as one of the things to do in West Cork, as seas off Baltimore are home to a fascinating variety of marine animals and birds Whale watching can bring you face to face with some of the largest animals on earth. Of course, there is no guarantee of what you will see, but sightings off Baltimore include minke whale, pilot whale, fin whale second in size only to the blue whale, humpback whale and killer whale, that return along with several species of dolphins to feed in West Cork's rich waters. Minke whales are the first to return in spring and feed here until December.  

          Dolphins off Baltimore Video Courtesy of Baltimore Sea Safari

During the summer they are joined by the fin whales, returning from their winter breeding grounds.  Weighing in at seventy tons, they are the world’s second largest animal. Most numerous are the dolphins common, bottlenose and Rissos dolphin whose tall fin sometimes leads to confusion with the killer whale and the common porpoise. Common dolphin and the larger bottlenose dolphin are attracted by moving boats and often give spectacular leaping displays right alongside.

Though whale watching tends to be best in fine weather, it is by no means exclusively a summer activity. A good time to see fin whales is in winter when they come inshore after sprats, sometimes in considerable numbers.

Photos Courtesy of Whale Watch West Cork 

Groups of friends love to go away together and an increasing trend within the 25-40 age group is activity breaks in Ireland. And Baltimore in West Cork is one of the centres of activity holidays in Ireland with its rich variety of maritime activities. Surprisingly, West Cork marine wild life has been compared to that of New Zealand and National Geographic Adventure magazine dubbed West Cork as the New Zealand of Europe. Over twenty species of whales pass through these waters every year. Sea kayaking is the fastest growing water sport in the world and the unspoilt coastline of West Cork suits it perfectly. The sheltered harbour in Baltimore is one of the safest around and kayakers can expect clear waters and lots of small islands to discover.

A great way to orientate yourself to Baltimore is to take a short walk to the Baltimore Beacon. The unique signal tower sits proudly at the head of Baltimore harbour and from this vantage point potential kayakers can get some idea of the beauty of the coastline that they will soon be exploring. Baltimore itself is also worth some exploration before taking to the waves.

Former British and Irish Kayaking champion Jim Kennedy runs Atlantic Sky Kayaking. Safety is paramount when kayaking in the sea and people of all experience levels are catered for. Kayakers can expect to stop off at ancient castles, sea caves and hopefully see an abundance of marine life such as seals, dolphins and even whales. One thing is for sure, kayaking is hungry work and after a day at sea it will definitely be time for a nice meal.

Part of the attraction of West Cork is the diverse range of marine wildlife that can be viewed from a kayak. Whale Watch West Cork offers boat trips around the coastline and the good news is that your kayak can be loaded onto the boat and once you get out to sea you can hop back in the kayak from a close up view of the marine life. Whale and even shark sightings are common but even if you are unlucky enough not to spot one, the abundance seals and sea birds will more than make up for the disappointment.

The Irish Times - Wednesday, November 30, 2011

First sighting of dolphin in Irish lake

PAT FLYNN

THE IRISH Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG) has confirmed the first sighting of a dolphin in an Irish lake, in Lough Hyne near Baltimore, Co Cork. This is the first time a cetacean has been found in such an environment.

The group’s sightings co-ordinator Pádraig Whooley said: “The IWDG frequently documents cetaceans in bays, occasionally in estuaries, rarely in rivers, but to the best of my knowledge, and I’m open to correction, this is the first validated record of a cetacean using an Irish lake.”

The sighting was made by Skibbereen-based kayaking instructor Jim Kennedy in recent weeks. He observed and filmed the juvenile/ calf over two days. Images sent to the whale and dolphin group have confirmed that it is a young common dolphin.

While the dolphin may have taken up residence in Lough Hyne, there have, however, been no sightings since of the mammal.

Mr Whooley said: “There were no further sightings after the second day, so we would not be overly confident that it made its way out of the lough into Barlogue Creek and back to open sea. But without any stranding reports within the lough, there is always a chance.”

“It also means we can add another habitat type that can potentially be utilised by Irish cetaceans and, of course, those tasked with conserving and studying this unique site can claim that its species diversity now extends to dolphins.”

The Irish Whale and Dolphin Group was founded in 1990 to establish an Irish stranding and sighting scheme and to campaign for the declaration of Irish territorial waters as a whale and dolphin sanctuary.

A year later, in June 1991, the late taoiseach Charles J Haughey declared all Irish waters to be a whale and dolphin sanctuary, the first of its kind in Europe. Two decades later, in April this year, the Haughey family donated the former taoiseach’s yacht Celtic Mist to the whale and dolphin group.

The yacht is undergoing refitting as a maritime research vessel.

Diving

Approximately three thousand people are drawn to Baltimore every year to dive on the shipwrecks, reefs, and other scenic locations.

Lough Ine Baltimore West Cork is one such site.  It is extraordinary in that it has an abundance of sea life, as well as fresh and sea water. It has an unusual tidal flow in that the tide takes about eight hours to go out but only four hours to come in again, due to the narrow channel through which the sea enters and leaves.

Baltimore in West Cork offers something for anyone interested in diving adventure. The coastline lies squarely in the path of the Gulf Stream thereby offering unpolluted waters with an underwater flora and fauna that are luxuriant and colourful - a diver's paradise with spectacular drop-offs and an abundant marine life.

As a sea-faring nation Ireland has many  wrecks which in themselves attract an eco-system and there are numerous close to Baltimore suitable for all levels of qualified divers.The best months to dive are between May and October, when the sea has had time to warm up and the visibility is at its best. Visibility is on average 10 mtrs and can reach 20+ on good days but less of course after stormy conditions.

The water temperature ranges from 9 degrees C in the winter (February is normally the coldest month) to 17 degrees C in the autumn (September). Surface water temperatures can reach slightly more which makes it very pleasant for snorkelling in these waters. West Cork is the feeding ground for some large species such as fin, humpback and minke whales. We also have sightings of dolphins, harbour porpoises, sunfish, basking sharks and leatherback turtles during our boat journeys out and an opportunity to swim with seals. Those not wishing to get in the water can enjoy Whale Watching or Eco Tours by bookings spaces on the boats for half day trips.

Ireland's underwater heritage is vast and as a seafaring nation our coast abounds with wrecks. The area around Baltimore in particular offers an opportunity to dive a range of exciting wrecks. The most famous are without doubt the U260 and Kowloon Bridge. However there are many others at shallower depths that provide a great dive and despite their age, still show some very prominent features. There are numerous deeper wrecks suitable for technical diving.

Some dive sites and in particular wrecks offshore require high or low water slack, Shore diving is also an option and particularly useful for inexperienced divers wishing to build up their ability to dive independently with another qualified diver. Baltimore has some of the best shore dive sites with easy access, & likely lots of marine life. One of these is Lough Hyne, a nearby Nature Reserve. Permits must be obtained 10 to 14 days in advance and are rarely denied.

Wrecks also provide an eco-system for marine life with plant and fish species transforming these over time, as wood and metal disintegrate. Walls, gullies, caves and rock formation all teaming with life, fed by the nutrient rich waters of the Atlantic and Gulf Stream. Unpolluted waters often give exceptional visibility but it's still worth diving with a torch to look into the nooks and crannies during your dives. The many offshore islands provide great shelter with a colourful underwater flora and fauna to enjoy, even on windy days.

The U260 Submarine

sank on 13th March 1945 and was built in March 1942 as a steel twin screwed VIIC Submarine, 1070 tonnage and measuring 67.1 m x 6.2 m x 9.6 m. She was patrolling the South Irish coast when she was reportedly mined 20 miles off Fastnet Rock. She lies in 42 metres and depending on the tide the top of her is in 36 metres, listing 50° - 60° to port (slack water dive only). There still remains the question of whether she hit the "78 pinnacle" or was torpedoed. Fishermen got their nets caught during the 1970s and sent a diver down to have a look..... she's also known as the Glandore Sub.

The Kowloon Bridge

was a British registered ore/bulk/oil carrier measuring 300 mtrs / 900 ft, 169,080 ton. She was built in 1973 by Swan Hunter in Belfast and a sister ship to the ill-fated Derbyshire which disappeared off the coast of Japan in September 1980. The Kowloon Bridge was wrecked on 24th November 1986 due to strong SW gale when she ran aground on the Stag Rocks. She lies in 36 mtrs and her shallowest points are around 17 mtrs following the collapse of the bow in recent years. Her cargo of 160,000 tons of iron ore is spread out, at that time valued at £2.7m. She had left Quebec on 7th November bound for Hunterston when she looked for shelter in Bantry Bay to effect repairs to deck cracks sustained during heavy Atlantic weather. Then, after having lost her starboard anchor in a heavy swell on 22 November 1986, she sailed out of Bantry bay but then lost her steerage and began to drift in continuing heavy seas. Due to the dangerous nature of the situation, the 28 man crew decided to abandon ship, being winched to safety by helicopters in mountainous seas. The helpless vessel was then driven aground in gale-force winds on Stag Rock, near Baltimore, Co. Cork. Despite the joint efforts of two of the world’s top salvage companies, Smit & Wijsmuller, the wrecked Kowloon Bridge could not be refloated and, when she broke her back on the rocks, all salvage attempts were abandoned. She was left to the elements to pound to pieces. The hull and machinery insurance was £8.4m. (Slack water dive only). Depth restrictions apply in view of divers' qualification level and experience.

Great Scenic Dive Sites

include the Fastnet Lighthouse, Spain Point and the River, Spain Reef, Kedge Gullies, the Arches, Blananarragaun, Crab Rock, Stags, Gascanane Sound, Sherkin, Cape Clear, Calf Islands, 78-Rock and Whale Rock to name but a few. These are ideal for enjoying a diverse underwater flora and fauna in gullies, on reefs, against walls, or even flying past them on drift dives when the tide is running.

Deep Sea Angling in Baltimore South West Ireland

The picturesque fishing port of Baltimore is in County Cork, 60 miles (97 km) south west of Cork city, situated at the point where the Gulf Stream meets the rugged south west coast. This is the southern tip of Ireland, sheltered from the prevailing westerly winds yet as close as possible to deep water. So it's not surprising that Baltimore is one of Ireland's top deep sea angling centres, with a fleet of well-equipped modern charter boats and an international reputation for reef, wreck and shark fishing.
With a good run of shark beginning around mid-June and often continuing into October, blue shark are one of Baltimore’s prime attractions for the angler. Warm weather offers the best prospects and, when there are plenty of shark about and an experienced skipper to guide you, stand a chance of catching one. The porbeagle shark, though much less common than the blue, also features in catches from time to time.

As at other ports around the West Cork coast, angling skippers at Baltimore tag sharks and then return them safely to the sea. Blue shark tagged off Baltimore have been recaptured as far away as Barbados! When you go fishing, you are assisting the tagging programme and contributing to scientific understanding of these relatively little-studied fish. Shark fishing apart, deep sea angling usually takes one of two forms: drifting with feathers or artificial lures or ground fishing at anchor with mackerel bait. The former tends to produce hectic sport with pollack, cod , mackerel, etc, while the latter affords a good chance of something really hefty. It might be a big conger eel, ling or even a turbot, but the biggest prize of all is the common skate, which regularly exceeds 45 kg in weight. Like shark, these superb fish are tagged and released.
Wreck fishing is another option. The wrecks tend to be well offshore in deep water and the outsize fish that haunt them notably conger, ling, pollack, coalfish and cod must be prevented from gaining sanctuary in the wreck. So this kind of angling is perhaps not for the beginner, but for the more experienced angler, it is one of the most exciting forms of the sport.
 
Whatever kind of fishing you choose, sometimes the day s catch will include a less familiar fish, such as Longfin Tuna. These visitors from warmer seas arrive courtesy of the Gulf Stream. In recent years anglers have also started to target tuna. A number of longfin tuna, or albacore, have been taken on rod and line south west of Baltimore, West Cork. Tuna fishing is not yet an established part of the angling scene, but it could become one in the future.
 Modern angling boats have powerful engines, sophisticated electronics, and all kinds of safety equipment. They carry anglers to and from the fishing grounds fast and safely. Individual anglers are welcome and skippers always do their best to accommodate them, though boats can also be chartered privately by families or groups. Fishing tackle may be hired on board and if advice is needed the skipper will be happy to help.
 
Boat anglers of an independent disposition may prefer to hire a self-drive boat or they may already have one of their own. Small boats are well suited to explore the large expanse of relatively sheltered water bounded by the islands that lie between Baltimore and Schull. The area also gives charter boats a unique alternative to the open sea if the weather is unhelpful. Mackerel, pollack, ray, small flatfish and dogfish make up much of the catch, though larger fish like tope are possible.

Good fishing should not be taken for granted. And, whatever you catch, a day at sea, against the backdrop of cliffs of Baltimore West Cork and the islands with their teeming populations of birds and other wildlife, is certain to prove a memorable one. Catching bait is seldom a problem. The Mackerel shoals appear off Baltimore in April and remain inshore until November. Sandeels and small Coalfish are also abundant and easily caught. And it's not just the fishing that you will enjoy. The clear blue sea and rugged coastline are a pleasure in themselves. Don't be surprised if you are visited by a school of dolphins, whales or even a leatherback turtle weighing more than half a ton (508 kg).

Charter Boats from Baltimore West Cork

Individual anglers are welcomed, though a whole boat can also be chartered privately. Most boats carry a maximum of between 8 and 12 anglers. For larger parties two or more boats may be arranged.

Deep Sea Diving Baltimore West Cork

Approximately three thousand people are drawn to Baltimore every year to dive on the shipwrecks, reefs, and other scenic locations.
Lough Ine Baltimore West Cork is one such site.  It is extraordinary in that it has an abundance of sea life, as well as fresh and sea water.
It has an unusual tidal flow in that the tide takes about eight hours to go out but only four hours to come in again, due to the narrow channel through which the sea enters and leaves.

Interested in diving and water adventure in the Baltimore area, Aquaventures & The Baltimore Dive Centre  offers something for everyone.

Mouth of Ilen River Baltimore West Cork:

Bottom fishing for flounder, dogfish, & occasional Bass. Spinning for Sea Trout at High Water, also float fishing for Mullet.

Trafaska Baltimore West Cork:

Spinning for pollack and mackerel at high water. Float fishing for Wrasse.

Barlogue Creek near Loughine:

Bottom fishing and spinning for Conger , Wrasse, Gurnard, occasional Ling, Pollack and Mackerel . Bottom fishing side for Dogfish and Conger also float fishing for Mullet.

Castle View:

Bottom fishing from point for flounder, dogfish, & occasional bass. Low Water to High Water best. Also spinning for sea trout at High Water.

Scullane Point:

Spinning for Pollack and Mackerel . Float fishing for Wrasse and bottom fishing for Conger .

Sandy Cove near Castletownshend:

Bottom fishing for flatfish and Dogfish at all stages of the tide. Spinning for Pollack on rocks to the west .

Horse Island near Ballydehob West Cork:

Bottom fishing for lesser spotted Dogfish , Bull Huss and Conger in channel . Moving left out of the channel area , flatfish and occasional Ray are taken at low water . Spinning for Coalfish and Pollack on floating tide.

Battery Point:

Spinning and bottom fishing for Pollack , flatfish and Dogfish at low water.

Blind Harbour West Cork:

Spinning for Pollack and Mackerel and float fishing for Wrasse. Bottom fishing for flatfish , Dogfish and occasional Ray.

Union Hall West Cork:

Bottom fishing for Flounder and spinning for Mackerel on the ontside of the pier. Late ebb to early flood.

Glandore to Union Hall Road Bridge:

Fishing from bridge for Flounder, Dogfish and Bass. Crab and lugworm best baits. Float fishing for Mullet.

Glandore West Cork:

Bottom fishing for Dogfish, Flatfish and occasional Bass.

Bait

The Friary:

Lugworm can be dug on sandy patches between rocks.Good quality black lugworms.

Rineen Union Hall: Lugworms can be dug in upper reaches of estuary.

Castletownshend West Cork: Lugworms above pier on eastern side of Estuary.

Union Hall West Cork: Good lugworm digging below Village. Also clam and Mussel.

Leap West Cork: Clams can be dug in and to the left hand side of the road.

Ilen River:

Float fishing for Mullet at Low Water in Channel beside the main road upstream of Bridge - round Bait with bread flakes.

Season - Salmon: 1st February to 30th September.

This is a medium sized river that drains a catchment of 117 square miles. It boasts good runs of Spring Salmon and Sea-Trout with fish being caught as early as March some years. Its Grilse run begins in June and continues into late July.

Sea trout: 1st February to 12th October.
Daily and Weekly Visitors permits. Excellent fly fishing at night for Sea trout.

Fair to good runs of fish depending on water levels on this small West Cork river. All legitimate angling methods allowed.

New Bridge

Skibbereen Bridge

Ballyhilty Bridge

Derreeny Bridge

Madore Bridge

Coarliss Bridge

Visitors permits will be available from Pierce Hickey Newsagents, The Square Skibbereen (028) 21354).
State Licences are available from Fallons of North St., Skibbereen
or online from Inland Fisheries Ireland.

 

Take a day sailing aboard Inishbeg our luxury 50 foot yacht through the islands of West Cork or sail around the Fastnet rock. Guaranteed sheltered water with magnificent scenery and wildlife. Only €100 per person including lunch on board. Half day cruises only €50 per person sharing including tea/coffee and snacks. Operating all year round and licenced by Dept of Transport for up to 12 guests plus crew.

 

You can book the boat exclusively for Hen parties, Stag parties, Staff outings or any special occasion. 

Whether it's a contemporary wedding, blessings or a civil ceremony, you can relax in the knowledge that your wedding will run smoothly.

Alex Rey - Cork

Thank you all so much for a wonderful stay! It couldn't have been more fantastic. The rooms, food and accommodations were lovely. We are planning our O'Driscoll family stay for next year with you!

Paul o’Driscoll - Mayo, Ireland

Stayed a night, it was so good we stayed another. The place is fantastic, cosy, warm. And the staff are great, welcoming and helpful. Food is some of the best food we have tasted on our trip so far. 

Paul C -

Walking home after our meal and sampling the home brew from the on-site West Cork Brewery was just what we needed as we were comfortably stuffed with the large, delicious portions of the freshest seafood around, not to mention the home brew..

Mary B -

Crab and prawn starter was very tasty and four of us had tempura of prawn starter as a main course. This was generous in size and really well cooked. 

Mark W -

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